Install a greenhouse

Fortunately, these days installing a greenhouse doesn’t have to have you permanently committing to just one location in your garden. Self-assembly greenhouse components aren’t even necessarily made of glass, so they’re even safer than before and they’re made of lighter transparent material so that they can be easily disassembled and reassembled elsewhere in your garden with which you can maximise the sunlight. Greenhouses are also great additions t which can be enjoyed from teak garden furniture.

Use wooden planters and clay plant-pots for mobility

It should be becoming clear by now that a huge chunk of what it means to maximise sunlight in your garden is ensuring mobility, so if you can avoid having to dig plants into a permanent location then you should do so. We’ve already discussed portable greenhouses as a way to essentially port the warmth of the sun and bring it to those permanently placed plants but otherwise use wooden planters and clay plant pots to ensure you can move some of the other plants around to get ample the requisite, direct sunlight. Teak wood is perhaps the best for wooden planters because it’s very durable and maintains it’s natural look natural in pretty much any garden setting.

Segment the flora according to size

You can actually plan the planting of big trees any way you want in relation to how their positioning is going to affect the amount of sunlight other plants get, but just make sure to plan carefully. In a few years time, when that big tree really flourishes and literally overshadows every think around it, you don’t want to have certain plants that love the direct sunlight suddenly not flourishing quite as well as they did before.

Natural shade is great, but it can always be made up for with some deck covering if you really want to enjoy your garden space without being directly exposed to the sun’s rays. The shade will greatly increase the chances of you enjoying your teak garden furniture.

So segment the flora according to size, planning for the indicative future distribution of direct sunlight accordingly. Plant shade-loving plants later on when the general structure affecting sunlight distribution starts to become more solidified.

Palisade fencing/walling

Walls can make for serious hindrance to the sunlight reaching your garden, so fencing is perhaps the way to go, but if you are thinking more about the security of your premises then palisade walls will at least let some good sunlight through. If the garden itself is designed well enough, the streaks of light passing through the palisade gaps can create some amazing visual effects.

One of our top design tips is to make sure you match the teak garden furniture to the fencing. This will help give your garden a complete look.

Lower-set walls

If you must have solid walls then lower set ones are best, but then again if it’s an issue of security then it’s best to go with the palisades.

Install elevated decking

Sometimes you might want to enjoy the warmth of the sun yourself during the chillier days when the sun is still out, in which case elevated decking would do the trick. It’s best situated as close to the property building as possible and away from the bigger trees that are otherwise better appreciated in the warmer months when it’s a shade that you’re after.

Zoe Kickhefer
zoe@everydaylifes.com